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The IES

 

We would like to invite you, students of all ages, and interested in issues like Education, Environmental Conservation, Sports, and especially Cultural Exchange, to join the International Education Society (IES).

The IES is a major division of the WEF, which acts as network and club. The IES Club will promote cultural exchange and approach students and people involved in Education related activities. Businesses, schools and supporters can also join the Club, to provide incitement of WEF education programs all over the world.

In addition, the IES offers a Certification Seal for partners, and a Quality Seal for schools and institutions that carry out excellence works in education, and in scientific and technological development.

Read more about the IES by clicking here or on the link at the top menu.

 

 

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EDUCATION

Education is the key to the development in any country. Those that are educated can solve country's problems. Those with increased education can improve the country's infrastructure, economy, etc. and so forth. Education can also improve health: death rates can decrease through education when citizens learn how to handle disease and illness properly, as well as daily hygiene.

Here at the WEF, we believe in the direct relationship between educational excellence and rewarding social/economic development. Global and regional examples show that large investments in human potential are the best solution for the serious socio-economic contrasts. We wish to use education to fight poverty worldwide.

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Education Gap Grows Between Rich and Poor

By SABRINA TAVERNISE (Adapted for the WEF)
The New York Times | February 9, 2012
 

Education was historically considered a great equalizer in American society, capable of lifting less advantaged children and improving their chances for success as adults. But a body of recently published scholarship suggests that the achievement gap between rich and poor children is widening, a development that threatens to dilute education’s leveling effects.

Education GapIt is a well-known fact that children from affluent families tend to do better in school. Yet the income divide has received far less attention from policy makers and government officials than gaps in student accomplishment by race.

Now, in analyses of long-term data published in recent months, researchers are finding that while the achievement gap between white and black students has narrowed significantly over the past few decades, the gap between rich and poor students has grown substantially during the same period.

“We have moved from a society in the 1950s and 1960s, in which race was more consequential than family income, to one today in which family income appears more determinative of educational success than race,” said Sean F. Reardon, a Stanford University sociologist. Professor Reardon is the author of a study that found that the gap in standardized test scores between affluent and low-income students had grown by about 40 percent since the 1960s, and is now double the testing gap between blacks and whites.

In another study, by researchers from the University of Michigan, the imbalance between rich and poor children in college completion — the single most important predictor of success in the work force — has grown by about 50 percent since the late 1980s.

The changes are tectonic, a result of social and economic processes unfolding over many decades. The data from most of these studies end in 2007 and 2008, before the recession’s full impact was felt. Researchers said that based on experiences during past recessions, the recent downturn was likely to have aggravated the trend.

“With income declines more severe in the lower brackets, there’s a good chance the recession may have widened the gap,” Professor Reardon said. In the study he led, researchers analyzed 12 sets of standardized test scores starting in 1960 and ending in 2007. He compared children from families in the 90th percentile of income — the equivalent of around $160,000 in 2008, when the study was conducted — and children from the 10th percentile, $17,500 in 2008. By the end of that period, the achievement gap by income had grown by 40 percent, he said, while the gap between white and black students, regardless of income, had shrunk substantially.

 

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